Get to know your rights with a mechanic’s lien

Get to know your rights with a mechanic’s lien

On Behalf of | Sep 28, 2020 | Construction Law |

You did a lot of work on a property for a client. They paid for the majority of the project up front, but your contract stipulated that they’d paid the remaining 25% upon completion.

Once you were finished, you completed a walk-through viewing with your client. They were satisfied with the work that you did, and they agreed that the project was finished. They told you they would send you a check shortly for the remainder.

A week or so later, nothing had arrived, so you reached out. They didn’t answer. You called again a day or two later, and again, you received a voicemail. This continued on for a few weeks until you decided to use a mechanic’s lien to enforce the payment.

Filing a mechanic’s lien can help you get the compensation you deserve

When a property owner doesn’t pay a portion of the amount that is owed for a project, then you may want to file a mechanic’s lien. You should do so soon after completing the project and if you realize that the other party is skirting their responsibility to pay.

When you’re ready to file, talk to your attorney about the project and how long it has been since the project was completed. Your attorney may reach out to the other party and indicate that you are going to file a lien if a payment is not made. In the end, if you do have the mechanic’s lien put in place, the property will not be able to be sold without you receiving payment and having the lien released (in most cases.)